CAWS guests enjoy the Green Season in Liwonde and Nyika

The Green Season is one of the most interesting times to travel across Malawi and visit its key national parks. Mvuu Camp and Lodge guests visiting Liwonde National Park during the Green Season have been treated to an array of interesting sightings. A total of nearly 100 crocodile hatchlings were spotted on a mud-bank in the Shire River, under the watchful eye of three adult crocodiles. Click here for more details. During the rains, elephant herds disperse into smaller units due to the ample availability of foliage and water sources, however our guests are still enjoying regular sightings of larger herds by the river.  Several hippos are now venturing out onto the river banks to give birth to their young. These calves are particularly vulnerable in their early days as their mothers have to consume a substantial amount of vegetation and often have to leave them alone whilst they graze. The Green Season is also an exceptional month for birding and guests can easily spot a variety of species on their daily boat safaris, game drives and guided walks.

Guests visiting Chelinda Camp and Lodge in Nyika National Park were treated to a burst of rainfall, followed by ample sunshine that allowed for excellent photo opportunities.  The scenery on the plateau remains breathtaking with clears skies and great visibility.

Chelinda guests have enjoyed recent leopard sightings of a large female leopard by Chosi View Point and thereafter guests spotted a large male leopard on an afternoon game drive. Other common sightings included that of side-striped jackals, serval cats and several more regular bird species such as yellow-billed kites, night-jars and eagle owls. The team has even spotted a few white-backed vultures, which are considerably less common.

The Green Season is expected to last until mid-April, to find out more about sightings and what to expect during your travels, contact M1@cawsmw.com (international inquiries) or reservations@cawsmw.com.

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